Friday, October 2, 2009

Fundraising fail

I just passed a table where a sorority is trying to collect money for their charity event. They're having a formal dance called "A Night to Remember." The charity?

Alzheimer's research.

I know their intentions are good, but I wonder if they realize the dark, twisted humor they've inadvertently created.

26 comments:

  1. BAHAHAHAHA. That's hilarious. Sad, but hilarious.

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  2. I think they did that intentionally. Seems to me the thought process would be, "if we raise enough money for Alzheimer's, then someday, people with Alzheimer's might be able to conquer the disease and remember again."

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  3. If they did it intentionally, its actually pretty witty. Otherwise it'd be like holding a charity pie-eating context to raise money for diabetes research.

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  4. Dan!, we have a club on campus that fights the war on hunger (can't remember their exact name) and they once had an ice cream social.

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  5. That's something I would expect from Frankie Boyle, but the involuntarity make it funnier.

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  6. Please, please tell me they did this on purpose "for the lulz" please, please, please.

    I know they didn't but goddamn that would have been a priceless joke.

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  7. I suspect it was deliberate. Bad taste would be ads suggesting that forgetting was good ("come forget your troubles at the XXX"). Note that you are remembering what they are advertising and telling your acquaintances (even if many aren't at Purdue), more people may learn about it and buy tickets.

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  8. Haha. That is awesome. Terrible, but still awesome.

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  9. Seriously! Thats amazing. I bet they didn't even think twice about it.
    Wow..

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  10. I think that has to have been intentional.

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  11. It probably wasn't intentional, and I doubt more than a few people will notice the humor.

    Most things like that go right over people's heads.

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  12. I don't think that's FAIL at all. "A Night to Remember" would make sense for Alzheimer's research. You could argue that it's a little tasteless, but the Alzheimer's Association of Indiana has a "Memories in the Making" art exhibit - http://alz.org/indiana/in_my_community_16012.asp

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  13. Yeah, that could actually be somewhat clever.

    Here's a breast cancer research fundraiser, billed as "BOOBIEFEST"... and it's Halloween-themed, which includes tombstones on the ad. Tombstones. Cancer. Oh so sensitive.

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  14. .......noticedIforgotthelinkRIGHTasIpushedpost. I beg forgiveness from great Ceiling Cat for my transgression.

    http://shakespearessister.blogspot.com/2009/10/boobiefest.html

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  15. I think it's awesome. Good on them for being a little tongue'n'cheek about it - a form of humour Americans in particular usually can't grasp.

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  16. Hmm. I think I agree with Andy J and the first anonymous commenter. They could very well be making the case that the night helps raise funds, thus furthering the goal of researching a cure/treatment for Alzheimer's, thus it is a night to be remembered (once cure found).

    Then again, I've been known to have too much faith (c*ringe at the word*) in people, so they could very well just be taking humor too far, or be completely unaware.

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  17. INADVERTENTLY?
    Think of all the names they could have given the dance, and they choose "A night to remember"... hardly a typical name for a dance, really.

    It's hard for me to believe that this wasn't purposeful.

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  18. "A Night To Remember" is a very typical name for a dance.

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  19. Put me down for this was on purpose. They're trying to help people remember. That's what the night's for. Sounds like a good name to me.

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  20. That's funny.

    You just reminded me of a fact there is no dance created for atheism or agnosticism or non-theism.

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  21. @Veritas - Although it's likely there have been dances with such a name, I would contend that it is not very common.

    To settle our disagreement, we would need a list of dance event names, along with frequency of use. I don't believe it would be practical to establish a study over something so trivial. It's more practical to just agree to disagree on that minor point...

    I stand firmly by my prior statement: It's hard for me to believe this wasn't purposeful. A lot of thought goes into planning an event like this, and I'm 99.999...% certain that the name would be given a rather large weight in proportions of the event's considerations.

    i.e. The event name's connection to its cause is not a coincidence.

    And by the way, why should we belittle the cognitive abilities of people who are working towards a good cause? It's not as though they are raising money to pay for accupuncture therapy for alzheimer's patients - such a connection would make for much more justified mockery. IMO posts like this just give justified ammunition for the religious that atheists are arrogant pricks. In fact, it even makes ME wonder if we atheists are at large very arrogant pricks...
    Not that there's anything wrong with that... (insert viagara commercial here)

    peace and love,
    josher

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  22. I tweeted about this the other day, didn't you see it? lol.

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  23. What's the problem? You can have a "walk for polio" event. Those who can will do what they can for those who can't. Using one's gifts to aid those who don't have the gifts is a form of charity and self-giving. What's your problem? Get a grip.

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  24. Hahaha I laughed so much! incredible, these folks should think the slogan more carefully...

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